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the Design Thread
#21
(02-19-2018, 08:40 PM)Tidal Wrote: In an effort to build a universal language, and to discuss aesthetic theory, this thread will focus on the Elements of Art and Principles of Design. As the conversation progresses it is hoped that others will get involved by adding commentary and visual examples that pertain to the subject at hand. While there are a few different thoughts on what is included on each list, a common grouping, and the one we'll start with here is as  follows.

the Elements of Art:
     Line
     Value
     Shape
     Form
     Color
     Texture
     Space

the Principles of Design:
     Balance
     Contrast
     Unity
     Movement
     Focal Point (Emphasis)
     Rhythm
     Pattern

As Val mentions, we describe art and design somewhat differently.  Function might be a word I would add to the design list.  Here are two vastly different ties that were dressed during a period when fishing took a less important part in my decisions.  I've posted both before and they each continue to satisfy me after all these years .  The first was never intended to be fished, it has no loop (eye) for attaching a line and was designed to give the viewer the impression of two birds on a branch.  The 2nd was shaped on a hook with the hope that it just might pass as a fish catcher.  In a nutshell, I tied the 1st mostly as art and the 2nd as a design.

dave



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#22
Dave, I REALLY like the second one!!! Less texture than the first one. I like both but for different reasons. I also really like texture....shagginess as I call it and I consciously try to add that to my flies. The body on the second one too with the opposing tapers of the body. Controlled texture maybe.
Happy Trails!

Ronn Lucas, Sr.
ronnlucassr.com
ronn@ronnlucassr.com
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#23
This is one of the coolest threads I've read in a long time.

Well worth it.

Thanks Val!
Jon Kopczyk
www.jkflies.com

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#24
You are welcome Jon!

Ahhhh.... the "F" word. I hear what you are saying Dave, and  I suppose it is at least in spirit in all we do here.

Gotz's fly above left -  "Two Turtle Doves" is a great example of informal balance in a composition.  

As Ronn pointed out too, an explosion of texture.

Can you pick out the colors in this fly that lean toward and analogous color scheme? Can you see the complementary colors?

In the fly on the right I see it a little different than Ronn. While there is indeed less "Shaggy" texture there also is more "smooth" texture in this fly. Like the 2TD fly there is also a degree of informal balance in this one too. Starting at the tail, the red crest below, the yellow crest above, the yellow/green slips in the middle the axis of balance. If it were formal (or symmetrical balance) both crest might be the same color. In the next joint to the right, the veiling above and below are not the same exact length but they are close enough to satisfy a feeling of balance with the silk wrapped shank being the axis. Toward the front of the fly, all the stuff below fills about the same as all the stuff above the shank in terms of distance from the shank.

It is interesting to me how a fly with so much stuff can be so easy to look at. I think this speaks to the notion of Unity as a composition devise. All the reds sort of get along, all the yellows and yellow-greens sort of get along, all the pointed wing shapes get along, in the main wing there is a smorgasbord of color, texture and shape that is echoed throughout the fly in other places. Notice too how the negative space between all the elements are similar in size, or progress in size along with the positive shapes they follow.

Obviously a well thought out and designed fly. Oops, I mean an obviously well thought out and designed piece of function.

...another hit from Steven Fernadez - VK

"Came about by thinking about "cross marries" in feathers. You know when two barbs in a feather are crossed over and you have to pull them apart and re-marry them straight? Well I wondered what it would be like to purposely tie with those feather sections, or even cross marry  some, so I drew some up. I didn't want to just do a formal composition with them, though. One day I was looking at a Challah bread, and I got the idea to tie a fly with that formal idea: braiding the feather, and working with the politics of the region. Challah has the colors of the Palestinian flag on one side, and the Israeli and US flags on the other, and by coincidence, British, French, Russian, Arab, etc as well. All of the meddlers. So the wing starts out as a married wing, and ends up as a mixed wing, with all of the colors in cacophony. The throat is black rump feather from a Silver Pheasant as yarmulke, over barred body feather from a Silver Pheasant as the keffiyeh, peeking through. The tail is obviously blood, and the hook is raw: partially unfinished with some of the original black "japanning" intact (though clear coated). It's mostly metaphoric, obviously symbolic, and a bit metonymic in it's transition from married to mixed wing from classic salmon tying."  - Steven Fernandez

   

   

   

   

   
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#25
(07-16-2018, 08:26 PM)Tidal Wrote: You are welcome Jon!

Ahhhh.... the "F" word. I hear what you are saying Dave, and  I suppose it is at least in spirit in all we do here.

Gotz's fly above left -  "Two Turtle Doves" is a great example of informal balance in a composition.  

As Ronn pointed out too, an explosion of texture.

Can you pick out the colors in this fly that lean toward and analogous color scheme? Can you see the complementary colors?

In the fly on the right I see it a little different than Ronn. While there is indeed less "Shaggy" texture there also is more "smooth" texture in this fly. Like the 2TD fly there is also a degree of informal balance in this one too. Starting at the tail, the red crest below, the yellow crest above, the yellow/green slips in the middle the axis of balance. If it were formal (or symmetrical balance) both crest might be the same color. In the next joint to the right, the veiling above and below are not the same exact length but they are close enough to satisfy a feeling of balance with the silk wrapped shank being the axis. Toward the front of the fly, all the stuff below fills about the same as all the stuff above the shank in terms of distance from the shank.

It is interesting to me how a fly with so much stuff can be so easy to look at. I think this speaks to the notion of Unity as a composition devise. All the reds sort of get along, all the yellows and yellow-greens sort of get along, all the pointed wing shapes get along, in the main wing there is a smorgasbord of color, texture and shape that is echoed throughout the fly in other places. Notice too how the negative space between all the elements are similar in size, or progress in size along with the positive shapes they follow.

Obviously a well thought out and designed fly. Oops, I mean an obviously well thought out and designed piece of function.

...another hit from Steven Fernadez - VK

"Came about by thinking about "cross marries" in feathers. You know when two barbs in a feather are crossed over and you have to pull them apart and re-marry them straight? Well I wondered what it would be like to purposely tie with those feather sections, or even cross marry  some, so I drew some up. I didn't want to just do a formal composition with them, though. One day I was looking at a Challah bread, and I got the idea to tie a fly with that formal idea: braiding the feather, and working with the politics of the region. Challah has the colors of the Palestinian flag on one side, and the Israeli and US flags on the other, and by coincidence, British, French, Russian, Arab, etc as well. All of the meddlers. So the wing starts out as a married wing, and ends up as a mixed wing, with all of the colors in cacophony. The throat is black rump feather from a Silver Pheasant as yarmulke, over barred body feather from a Silver Pheasant as the keffiyeh, peeking through. The tail is obviously blood, and the hook is raw: partially unfinished with some of the original black "japanning" intact (though clear coated). It's mostly metaphoric, obviously symbolic, and a bit metonymic in it's transition from married to mixed wing from classic salmon tying."  - Steven Fernandez




Thanks for your observations Val.  Now onto Mr. Fernandez's work.....whose work I have admired and respected, especially considering it's overall breadth and excellence.

When I was teaching, I often asked my culinary students..How do you improve on a perfect peach?  Peel, slice, simmer, bake, or barbecue it until its lost it's identity?  Certainly in a restaurant our customers expected more than a whole peach served on a plate with the assurance from the Chef that " It's good as is".  Steven understood this from the start when he created and presented us his magnificent Pompadour wing.  He took a magnificent natural shape of his own design, much akin to the famous Nike Swoosh and the Coca Cola logo, and attached it to a metal surface in a manner that took the fly tying world by storm.  Like the peach ( which I served sliced with clotted cream and aged vinegar), Steven presented his shape largely unencumbered/uncluttered on a material we might call a hook.  Working with such a gorgeous shape it makes sense to dress it lightly with materials that balance and complement.  It's great to see Mr. Fernandez weaving texture into the showcase wing piece (your last post) but think it breaks into the rhythm of the design.

It would be nice for Steven to join us in our attempt to articulate and celebrate.  Shape, balance, line, unity are all aspects that come to mind 

dave
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