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the black argus h&b 6/0xl
#11
That one is in on my list Shawn, I like your's very much!

Nicely done sir, very nice!


Thanks,

Jon
Jon Kopczyk
www.jkflies.com

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#12
cheers, lads.

there's some intentional cheats behind the design... and I'll apologise to the yanks now for using new money.

   

the three bodies are equal at 13mm with 2mm herls.
the keeled feathers below consist of 2mm rachis graduations with the ic starting at 20mm. the intention being to land the reflected upper ic and bc between the eyes of the slightly rising wing.
the eyes of the tragopan share spacings of 9mm, 8mm and 7mm (to the white of the summer duck).
other details, and not being mathematical as such, include the barring of sd in line with the penultimate herl, horns finishing at hook bend and your tip/tag placement. 
these typical details provide a visual symmetry.

I know there is some belief the front section should be longer for balance (and though I disagree other than an actual 2/5 to 3/5)... I suppose this may be all right for two bodied flies.
as you can see I take the pattern's 'equal' bodies quite literally; any deviation on a greater bodied fly soon draws the eye and sparks notice.

I approach all of my tying in this manner now. it takes away from an artistic licence and leaves the fly very formulaic but that is the 'style' that I'm aiming for nowadays.
upon reflection I realised that my past tied flies were lent to an ever-changing pattern of personal style that I could not maintain.
but I can control the maths. and the numbers never lie.

so let us say flies tied in this mathematical style are soulless and I will agree.
I have no intention of retaining this fly and it will be more 'marketable' if it appeals to the masses over the few.


people say love makes the world go 'round... I truly believe it's math.
but then again, of course I would. 

cheers again,
shawn

edit: the photo is of my last black argus. I'd aimed to tie this one better.
everything in this world is, at its very least, slightly more important than tying feathers to a hook.


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#13
Well stated Shawn. I appreciate your candor and personally identify with your third paragraph. Attempting to be new in all our endeavors is a heavy lift. I've seen your woodworking and there's no question that precision and predictability are well served by mathematical solutions. I look forward to seeing your next.

dave
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