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Fitzgibbon flies
#1
This is the first me I've posted on this forum; and I have seen he quality of tying.
I have just started tying again after quite a while and I was never that fantastic with classic ties anyway.
I have done a couple of flies and want to get some honest and brutal feedback on them. Lay it on me..

Maybe not so brutal


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He who shall not be able to make a trout fly, after studying these diagrams and directions, must be deficient either in brains or in manual dexterity. : Edward Fitzgibbon 1853
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#2
Nothing to be ashamed of here Rampant...with the fly on the salmon hook being the superior of the two. The fly on that interesting streamer hook is well done with the exception of the tip/tag area which needs a little refinement. These flies show obvious skills on your part...keep'em coming.

I do have one suggestion...use hard plastic to protect the hook's finish in the vise. By that I mean the thin stuff like the clear covering for batteries and various other everyday items we all use. I learned early on that paper or cardboard can damage the finish on some hooks.
Petri Heil,
George
The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits - Albert Einstein
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#3
Welcome to the forum! Pull up a chair, pour yourself a cup of coffee and take a doughnut but the fritters are mine!

Formalities aside, I agree with George plus...…. Good looking flies. The first fly I can't see the floss so I can't comment on that. Also, both of the flies look like there is quite a bit of materials ending right at the wing mounting area so it kicked the wing up. The second isn't quite as much of stuff piled up. More often than not, it is dubbing that piles up there. Plan ahead and a fair amount behind the wing mounting area use just enough dubbing to colour the thread. Then, tie off other materials on the sides and or below that area. The second fly (the streamerish one) the floss is very uneven. I know you can do much better given your skills on the rest of the flies. Remember that EVERYTHING under floss will show through it! It's quite a big deal and can lessen the visual quality of an otherwise well tied fly. It will at least for knowledgeable viewers. Keep at it and showing us your flies.
Happy Trails!

Ronn Lucas, Sr.
ronnlucassr.com
ronn@ronnlucassr.com
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#4
It was late last night and I posted the Islander I was using for reference. I am sorry for the error.
I humbly put forward my version.

Thanks for the comments; sorry again for the error. With the streamer I understand about the floss work being substandard, I'll pay more attention.

Cheers, Mark


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He who shall not be able to make a trout fly, after studying these diagrams and directions, must be deficient either in brains or in manual dexterity. : Edward Fitzgibbon 1853
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#5
Hi Mark and welcome ! George and Ronn have given you good advice. There are a several ways to achieve quality flosswork and they all require a smooth underbody and patience.

I think you made a studied decision on your hook choice for the Erin go Bragh. There are many ways to interpret the positioning of wing materials on this pattern but the hook is traditionally always like yours. It sets the stage for a streamer profile but the angle and density (web) of your forward hackle detracts from that look. Have you tried stripping one side of the hackle? Maybe a few less turns? Also its no sin to wet and sweep back hackle to get a more rearward flow. Just let it dry then brush before you take the photo

On the 2nd fly, same issues with floss and hackle. Also, it looks like the underwing was set on the shoulders, not top, of the shank.

You've plenty of skills already Mark but what stuck out was the wool and herl heads, they are really top shelf. Looking froward to your next

dave
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#6
Cheers for not being brutal; I did let the hackle get away from me, as I read you mentioning it, it struck me as obvious.
Cheers for the advice, and I'll work on the under body treatment.
Mark
He who shall not be able to make a trout fly, after studying these diagrams and directions, must be deficient either in brains or in manual dexterity. : Edward Fitzgibbon 1853
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#7
Hi Mark:
As a salmon fly novice myself, I have found the tutorials on Ronn's web site very helpful. There is one specifically on tapering tags and bodies.
Best,
Dave
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#8
Cheers for the info Dave.
Mark
He who shall not be able to make a trout fly, after studying these diagrams and directions, must be deficient either in brains or in manual dexterity. : Edward Fitzgibbon 1853
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