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graceful lines & a stroke of luck
#1
Sometimes 10% of our work ends up being 90% of a fly's success.  I have no doubt that this design would catch fish, there's really not that much new to it.  We all can see the 'when and where' to fish it.  What makes it special, in my mind, are the svelte lines and hugging flow of the turkey wing to the body and tail, and how lucky I was to have a GP crests with such pronounced scarlet tips.
I think this a good pattern to attempt for those who want to take their love of 'classic wets' to a different level, it's inexpensive and lends itself to experimentation.  One change I would make...I brought too much thread and materials to the head.  I've posted this fly before and still hope it is relevant and contributes.  For those hesitant to post their work, jump in !  If I could grease the wheels, send me a PM. 

dave


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#2
   

   

5lb whitebait feeding hen, northern tasmania.

graceful lines..? not so much. 
but total luck as it was the only one caught, three lads and three days...

cheers,
shawn
the difference between art and a hobby is you can plagiarise for a hobby.


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#3
THAT FLY is as close to perfect as I've ever seen. The lines, color combo, flow, and more. Just superb!!!
Petri Heil,
George
The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits - Albert Einstein
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#4
here's another I found from a few years ago... flies for the fishing.

   

   


if you own a copy of a novel called 'keeper' you'll find this fly, sketched by bob white, at the top of each chapter.

yeah, I know... whoopty doo,
shawn
the difference between art and a hobby is you can plagiarise for a hobby.


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#5
I do like that fly Shawn...and the hook adds a certain panache Cool ...or whoopty doo if you prefer Tongue
Petri Heil,
George
The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits - Albert Einstein
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#6
Lovely fly Dave! I can't tell what you did with the floss at the very end of it that's a little dark but I like it. Like the tinsel too. the hackle has your hands all over it and especially the bit of dubbing which is all you too.

Shawn, really nicely done too!
Happy Trails!

Ronn Lucas, Sr.
ronnlucassr.com
ronn@ronnlucassr.com
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#7
Thanks gents. Shawn's sleek and slender married wings really punctuate the look and demonstrate the important role the hook plays. Ronn, thanks for taking the time to dissect the dressing. Sometimes it's those little things that often go unnoticed that give the tier special satisfaction. It was your tutorial on wet flies that inspired me to try to emulate a wing that is cradled by the topping. I think you know the fly my friend, please attach it's pic to this thread if you can

dave
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#8
Not sure what the fly is Dave. "......it's those little things that often go unnoticed that give the tier special satisfaction". Exactly! All of our flies and all of the tyers go through an evolution over time.....a long time for some. We start with simple materials and ways of applying them. At a distance, the flies look good but more often than not, look stiff/sterile at least to me. My early flies  had level bodies/tags and at the time, I preferred that look. Later, as I looked at other tyers flies and the built up underbodies and then I liked that. Then a number of years ago when I used glass beads in the flies, building up the tags/bodies to give more of a tapered look from the tip/tag to the head. Later I tied flies without beads so I built up the bodies with tapering from both ends with pronounced "humps" where I had usually put the beads on. Where will this go? We'll see.

I look at all flies by other tyers and see what I like or don't. Your flies Dave and other tyers like Davy McPhail have a bit of "shagginess" or "texture"  purposely added and I like that look and tied my fishing flies, usually wets/nymphs with added bits of dubbing particularly at the heads. So I purposely add. Then, I began using usually three different tinsels for ribs. You can't really see that feature from a distance but close up, the detail is there. It's subtle at a distance but you'd know if they weren't there. See What I mean with this fly.


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Happy Trails!

Ronn Lucas, Sr.
ronnlucassr.com
ronn@ronnlucassr.com
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#9
You've got it right, Ronn.."It's subtle at a distance but you'd know if they weren't there". Your fly is magnificent, Like a Faberge Egg. And like all fabulous jewelry it welcomes the scrutiny of magnification.

The fly I was referring to was Lesson #3 on your site

dave
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#10
Ha. That fly was done a long time ago. Not what I do now. But a good fishing fly. Take care my friend!
Happy Trails!

Ronn Lucas, Sr.
ronnlucassr.com
ronn@ronnlucassr.com
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