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Tuck Cast design
#1
        Just like trout fishing, when I'm after Steelies or LLocked I often come across bucket holes that need more than a sinking line to probe it's possibilities.  I call one spot the 'Picnic Table' to describe it's size.  Short of adding shot or weight to the fly, a well executed tuck cast will sometimes be the ticket.  The fly reminds me of the jig n pig combos I used when I was younger...two separate components offering different looks and motions. A mix of well defined borders and blended materials combined  with a bit of wiggle and a bit of sway.  The color palette was chosen with Steelhead in mind.  I have yet to fish it.  Two looks...one as it came off the vise and one after brushing.  Thoughts/comments?

dave
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#2
Very interesting tie...beautiful actually...and a very interesting approach to a demanding fishing problem. With that tuck cast approach I'd be willing to wager this fly will be loved by both the steelhead and land locks!! Just super Dave!!
Petri Heil,
George
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#3
"A mix of well defined borders and blended materials combined " this says a lot!

How are you getting the layered/veiled colors in the front joint? That effect working with the biots(?) is good stuff too.
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#4
Thanks. This fly deserves a test drive. Although I haven't fished it yet, I'll bet lengthening the tail just a scooch and replacing the Macaw with a more pliable material might work out better.

George: I grew up fishing the original Mister Twisters: You remember, a static body and a fluttering tail. I'm trying to duplicate the success I had when I stuck it behind a flowing jig head.
Val: Thanks for your comments. I'm a big believer in blended floss bodies. I'm unsure whether to address it in this or the 'Creative' forum.

dave
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#5
Gotz excellence!!
Happy Trails!

Ronn Lucas, Sr.
ronnlucassr.com
ronn@ronnlucassr.com
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#6
(03-14-2018, 02:52 PM)Tidal Wrote: "A mix of well defined borders and blended materials combined " this says a lot!

How are you getting the layered/veiled colors in the front joint? That effect working with the biots(?) is good stuff too.

Yes Sir, those are goose biots.  I think they provide a good static opaque presence that breaks up body profile.

As for the front joint....I blend flosses in two ways.  Both involve splitting the silk.  Sometimes to the point where you are using just a fraction of the width as it comes off the spool, and in some instances just 3-4 strands .  In this fly's case, three flosses were used and were applied together over a white thread base.  Pink 10%, a grey 60%, and blue green 30%.  I tie them in staggered, but wrap them together.  The stroking of the floss to flatten it as it moves forward blends them.  If you're looking for a more distinct separation...your wrapping hand will be closer to the hook shank.  Think in terms of wrapping a mixed wing vs. a married one.  I hope that makes sense, Val.

The second method (seen on this Speyish dressing) involves wrapping a base of a single colored floss and palmering a sheer combination of flosses (as described above) as an overlay.  If the second wrap in fine enough, it's colors will blend with the color of the base and then it's a whole new ball game.  Burnish the heck out this application, with good circular motions.

The possibilities are endless.  The biggest hurdle for me was getting proficient at splitting each of the different flosses out there.  I ended up with a few ziplocks of floss remnants that used to be throw aways.

dave


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#7
Thanks for sharing that technique. Sometimes fish dont care, and sometimes the most subtle of differences does. This helps.

Your last fly is too big a file for me to see, only the barb back visible but I can see the orange biot in there too.
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#8
Yes, I agree...Small differences make a difference both in flies intended to catch and work where fishing takes a back seat.  Perhaps I should have posted in the Creative/Artisitc forum?


Sorry that the image is too big, Val.  I'm just beginning to discover our site.  They are jpeg's @ 1.47 mg.  Here are 2 more attempts


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#9
To me, it belongs where you need it to belong.

On my end old habits die hard. I would talk about a Green Butt Skunk the same if it inspired me to do so. I don't know why your image is not showing full size? IT is exactly the same size as the one above that is? I really like this new format and how there are no more thumbnails so I hope it works out.

For this one I just right clicked and "view image" brought it up fine. I see now what you mean about the contrast of the banding softening up with the change of floss application angle on this one. I really like the colors pallet on this one too!
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