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Tyers Block??
#11
Dave, get that hook out of the vise and put a single back in the jaws. I bet that hook might be intimidating to look at it all that time. Not saying you can't dress the hook/s! I have times that might have taking more time to address because the materials I wanted to use, or some other reason. Sometimes the size of the hook or materials can slow me up. My comfort zone is big hooks say 8/0 to 14/0 so while I may find huge flies easier to tie those sizes than small flies. So, I have to struggle downsizing flies which might be reversed for more normal tyers whose comfort zones are say 1/0 to 5/0 +-. Then, there is the perfection trap. I try to tie everything as good as I can and know when good is good enough. Other tyers I know who are obsessed with perfection who are unhappy with their flies that we all know are awesome flies and cut them up. Then there is what I call flies "home runs" to use a baseball analogy. Very few of my flies are home runs and are flies I really like but are pretty good by any standard. Every one of us tied flies when we started that we thought were great flies but one to five years out, make us cringe when looking at them. We've all gone through these changes as our skills improved.

It is a hobby and hobbies should be fun!!!
Happy Trails!

Ronn Lucas, Sr.
ronnlucassr.com
ronn@ronnlucassr.com
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#12
it's going to sound strange but I sometimes I find procuring the materials for flies more fun than its tying execution.
I'm the exact same way with fishing trips. we plan, get everything together, perhaps flights, plan menus, write it all down/chart (albeit lazily).
I get on the water, prepare the rod, cast the fly and think 'wtf am I doing here? I should be doing other things.'
eventually it wears off and I enjoy myself for what it's worth.
if I catch a fish straight away I swear it's even worse...

I don't know what it is with the planning... I should have become a town councillor, hey.

it may have just dawned on me right this second why I became a builder. I suppose I can die now.

cheers,
shawn
the difference between art and a hobby is you can plagiarise for a hobby.


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#13
I read all of these responses and smiled...and of course I knew all along I'm not the only one who gets "tyer's block" as I call it.

Ronn & Shawn are right...it is a hobby and to be enjoyed...which I have always done on a number of different levels.

So what to do to get the juices flowing again? Yesterday I actually did something that sounds like a small project Shawn might do. I took all my tying tools that are stored scattershot in the drawers where I also have spools of thread, vise parts and a  host of miscellaneous other necessities that every tyer can't live without. I fussed over everything and began to reorganize the entire lot. End result was I felt that urge to get back over the vise. Today I will deliver a few streamers I tied a while back for a friend who is headed north for landlocked salmon in a couple of weeks...then complete that reorganization project and get started on completing the Blue Jock Scott in the vise...leaving only the Claret Jock Scott to complete the set for the second time.

So far I think the first first go round looks better Rolleyes 

Finally...I always find it most interesting that people from all over the planet can have so much in common and understand the ups and downs of something as simple as putting silk, fur, feathers and whatnot on a piece of steel. Gotta love it.
Petri Heil,
George
The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits - Albert Einstein
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#14
Way to go George!!! Now to get Gotzmer going!!!!
Happy Trails!

Ronn Lucas, Sr.
ronnlucassr.com
ronn@ronnlucassr.com
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#15
You can also try moving your tying station. Different scenery might break old habits and spawn some creativity.
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#16
Not a bad idea Val...but options are limited at the moment.

However...reorganizing the tools proved to be fun and most interesting. I will hopefully finish that this morning...but in the meantime I think you guys will get a bit of a chuckle of the attached photos. What happens when you've been tying for 50+ years Rolleyes Rolleyes


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Petri Heil,
George
The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits - Albert Einstein
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#17
(08-29-2019, 12:11 PM)Ronn Lucas Sr. Wrote: Dave, get that hook out of the vise and put a single back in the jaws. I bet that hook might be intimidating to look at it all that time. Not saying you can't dress the hook/s! I have times that might have taking more time to address because the materials I wanted to use, or some other reason. Sometimes the size of the hook or materials can slow me up. My comfort zone is big hooks say 8/0 to 14/0 so while I may find huge flies easier to tie those sizes than small flies. So, I have to struggle downsizing flies which might be reversed for more normal tyers whose comfort zones are say 1/0 to 5/0 +-. Then, there is the perfection trap. I try to tie everything as good as I can and know when good is good enough. Other tyers I know who are obsessed with perfection who are unhappy with their flies that we all know are awesome flies and cut them up. Then there is what I call flies "home runs" to use a baseball analogy. Very few of my flies are home runs and are flies I really like but are pretty good by any standard. Every one of us tied flies when we started that we thought were great flies but one to five years out, make us cringe when looking at them. We've all gone through these changes as our skills improved.

It is a hobby and hobbies should be fun!!!

Ronn, I don't know if you remember me...I'm the guy who sent you the photocopies of some of Gene Sundys hooks. Like many of us, I am a perfectionist and have 3 or 4 of my "home runs" that I won't sell sitting on a shelf right next to a framed display that Don Leydon did for me years ago of my fist classic salmon flies...it is a great reminder of progress. In the end, for me, I think its all about progress not perfection. An old friend of mine used to say "the definition of an expert was someone who could tell the difference between black pepper and fly shit"...keeps me humble...I too have checked my ego at the door..I think?
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