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Today i smoke salmon
#1
Not any tying today. In Norway we have tradition using smoked salmon we eat on bread with butter and boiled eggs in Chrismas time so today its smoking salmon and drinking coffee. Very good food. I wonder if you have the same tradition in US or other countries.


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#2
KO,

Your tradition sounds lovely! I like smoked salmon. Yours looks delicious! Is it more a "hot" smoke -- or over the coals, so the meat is slightly cooked?

Here in South Carolina, on the old family farm with Dad, I have a lot of holiday baking traditions from his Mother, my Grandmother. Starting in early December, I'll bake her cinnamon rolls, cheese wafers, pecan cookies, and fruitcake. And often another cake, now that other family members are asking for them. When her siblings, my Great Uncles and Aunts were alive, we'd butcher one or more hogs once the weather started to cool, so there would be fresh hams, sausages and bacon in the smoke house. Dad and I don't use it anymore. There was and is always some sort of game. The ducks on the front pond aren't hunted anymore, but they were often roasted for fancy dinner on Christmas or New Years. Or a late season deer, so we could have venison. Dad and I still hunt, and he got a deer earlier this year. We also have a tradition of black-eyed peas and cooked greens on New Years Day.

You've made me want a cup of Grandmother's spiced tea and a slice of fruitcake! (And to try smoked salmon with butter and boiled eggs!)

Michael
Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after. - Henry David Thoreau
To him, all good things—trout as well as eternal salvation—come by grace and grace comes by art and art does not come easy. - Norman Maclean

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#3
We also use fried pork for Christmas food, also dried and salted lamb meat that we boil, lutefisk is also a delicacy and 7 varieties of cakes but the cakes I skip. The smoked salmon is first salted and sugared for 2-3 days. About 70% salt and 30% sugar. Then dry it 1-3 days before smoking it with cold smoke for 10-15 hours. The smoke is not above 20 degrees. I use moose and juniper to make smoke.I use google translate on some words i dont know. Hope they are correct and that you understand.
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#4
I understand and the translation is fine. I used to work with Intelsat and USAID, so I've traveled to a number of places outside the US, and sampled lots of food. More diplomacy should be done around a table (or around a campfire on a fishing trip) -- the world would be a better place.

The salt and sugar season and sweeten the salmon and pull out moisture, so it has a firmer texture when smoked. (Like making lox without the peppercorns and dill.) Drying it out for a couple days lets the filets form a "tacky" skin that'll catch and hold the smoke -- for better flavor and preservation. Sounds like you know what you are doing!!!

We used to smoke pork with post oak or blackjack oak, with pecan or hickory (and sometimes apple or peach wood -- from orchard trimmings). The wood burns hot / well and gives good flavor. The smoke house is offset, only some of the heat and most of the smoke go into the house. I've missed being off the farm for the past 30 years. Time to sweep away the cobwebs and start doing more stuff like we used to do.

Have a great holiday!

Michael
Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after. - Henry David Thoreau
To him, all good things—trout as well as eternal salvation—come by grace and grace comes by art and art does not come easy. - Norman Maclean

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#5
Yep. Personally i think the world spinning around way to fast, i try to slow it down hehe. Many of the young people today dosent know anything about how to live outside the big cities. I like to do things oldschool. I can buy both smoked salmon, bacon etc. but its very expensive and i think i make it much much better and probably healtier my self.
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#6
KO,

I was searching through old Forest and Stream issues for salmon fishing related material and found this from A. N. Cheney, in 1900.

Green Smoked Salmon

I liked the fish so well that I asked Mr. [Dean] Sage to call up the Indian who officiated at the smokehouse to tell me how he smoked the fish, and here is how it is done, as I noted on the back of an envelope: split the fish down the back, take out the backbone, put in pickle of salt, molasses, and water.  Molasses one-half cup, salt and water enough to make brine and cover fish.  Leave the fish about two hours to pickle, then open the fish, put skewer across it on skin side to hold it open and flat, rub a little sugar and pepper in flesh side, and smoke two days with smoke from beech wood.  For green smoked salmon small fish should be used.  The smokehouse is made of bark with an opening in front near the bottom for the smoke fire, and a door at the back for putting in and taking out the fish.

They were having the smoked salmon for dinner at the camp on the Ristigouche.

Michael
Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after. - Henry David Thoreau
To him, all good things—trout as well as eternal salvation—come by grace and grace comes by art and art does not come easy. - Norman Maclean

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#7
Thanks a lot. Interesting. You know the fly i asked about. If you go to this open fb site and scroll down a bit you find it. https://m.facebook.com/groups/255970247760748/
It seems like this chap Jason Lewis have loads of old flies. I am not sure but i belive i seen some of his old flies on Colin Innes wonderful site.
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#8
Great stuff here guys. Holiday season traditions I grew up with...hmmm Huh

Mom always baked lots of cookies, a pumpkin pie was always on the menu and the once per year specialty...suet pudding. Doesn't sound appetizing I know, but it is exquisite with the "hard sauce" put over it when served Big Grin Haven't had it in ages, but now that I've thought of it I'll have to look for the recipe to try and make it for the first time in years Exclamation

The usual Turkey and all the trimmings for Christmas dinner, followed by traditional pork and sauerkraut on New Years Eve or New Years Day which is supposed to bring good luck throughout the year.

That's all that comes to mind at the moment except for the regular libations...including wine, both still and sparkling, beer and/or ale, egg nog laced with Italian Frangelico or bourbon, perhaps an Irish coffee or cappuccino. In other words good times, good food and good drink with family and friends Smile
Petri Heil,
George
The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits - Albert Einstein
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#9
KO,

I'm going to have to check out that Facebook group. I haven't been on FB in years -- hopefully I can browse without a login. I agree, Colin Innes has loads of information and great flies on his site. I'm glad that he shares information freely for all of us. It is important that we remember our history and learn from it. Many techniques we use today are old, but you have to read between the lines and pay attention to the details.

George,

Suet pudding. Something I haven't thought of in years. My UK friend make one that is delicious. It is good with hard sauce. She prepares it in crockery pot wrapped in cheesecloth and steamed for hours. I didn't know about pork and sauerkraut being lucky. I was thinking about pork chops and purple cabbage for supper. Wonder if that would still be lucky? When / if you find your recipe, send it to me. Otherwise, I'm going to have to ask Tesa for hers -- and it's her Grand-mum's, so bribery will be involved.

Sounds like we've got some good cooks here!

Michael
Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after. - Henry David Thoreau
To him, all good things—trout as well as eternal salvation—come by grace and grace comes by art and art does not come easy. - Norman Maclean

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#10
Its open, you dont need facebookaccount. I havent.
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